Human Spider's Web

itswalky:

fororchestra:

Rebecca Black ‘Friday’ For Orchestra

iTunes   Bandcamp   Amazon   Other

‘cuz why not

gifftrax:

[RiffTrax: “Twilight: Eclipse”]
rifftrax:

This Week’s Deal is our riff of Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones! Just $1.99 for this week only!

rifftrax:

This Week’s Deal is our riff of Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones! Just $1.99 for this week only!

drawingnothing:

CHILIDOGS

I wish Sega would do the exact same thing with Shadow and Silver.

drawingnothing:

CHILIDOGS

I wish Sega would do the exact same thing with Shadow and Silver.

ealm528:

groovygiygas:

Team Rocket Appreciation Post

from all the Team Rocket trio expression appreciation posts i’ve seen

this one wins no matter what you say

everyone else go home

kwmurphy:

Ten years after the print version, A YEAR AT THE MOVIES is going to be released as an ebook by HarperCollins.  
It won’t be in time for the holidays, sorry, but it will have a new introduction, in which I will try to distill ten years of moviegoing into a thousand words and open with a joke.  
For those who haven’t read it, or those who did so long ago, it’ll be a chance to read it in its new non-material form.  It may read as an idiosyncratic time capsule, and that’s okay by me. 
More details anon.  

kwmurphy:

Ten years after the print version, A YEAR AT THE MOVIES is going to be released as an ebook by HarperCollins.  

It won’t be in time for the holidays, sorry, but it will have a new introduction, in which I will try to distill ten years of moviegoing into a thousand words and open with a joke.  

For those who haven’t read it, or those who did so long ago, it’ll be a chance to read it in its new non-material form.  It may read as an idiosyncratic time capsule, and that’s okay by me. 

More details anon.  

rifftraxmike:

Man, we at RiffTrax have done a LOT of Coronet films.

An Open Letter to Our Readers: On Ethics, Death, and the Need to Continue

goodgameswriting:

Dear Readers—
Good Games Writing has been silent as of late: A proper explanation is owed.

Near the end of October, several questions arose about journalistic ethics as they pertain to games writing, and, we think, about personal responsibility. You may find a summary of the event here. The topic has been raised continually since, and our initial silence was in response. Just what could we say on the issue? Just as we formulated a response, the community was hit with shocking news: A member of the games writing community had committed suicide.

Since those happenings, we’ve had serious deliberations on games writing. They follow:

It’s About Trust, Man

Patrick Klepek notes that “trust is the most important tool” games writers have. That’s a lofty statement, and backed up in the rest of his article well. Our belief is that every form of the games writing field demands some fashion of trust. Reviews involve trust in skill, history, and articulation. Exposes and news demand trust in sourcing and diligence. Interviews demand trust in clarity. And trust is what brings you, the reader, back to read the work writers produce.

The differentiation in games writing isn’t about why ones comes into it, though. Simply, it’s one’s role, regardless of motivation. As we alluded to, games writing isn’t one particular thing: There are critics, there are journalists, reporters, bloggers, pundits, analysts, and a slew of other roles. Games writers must be able to understand and embrace the role they play while understanding that their role is fluid, ever changing. One need not be a journalist—blogging is fine!—but knowing the distinction is a must. For you, the readers, being able to pinpoint these distinctions is also essential: If a pundit veils his or her work as criticism, there’s an obvious issue of trust.

Personal Accountability

Many are talking about the issue of trust and accountability, but few seem to be making public their role in all of this. Lewis Denby, however, raises an interesting point: Who has trained their writers in ethics? For his part, he notes that he has failed training his writers and suspects he is not alone. Indeed, we’d like to see more publications make a public stand. Publish a clear code of ethics that binds your contributors. Then enforce it.

Preaching is one thing, following through another. While calling out those that don’t play by the rules is essential, so, too, is raising the bar through your own actions. Publications—and, indeed, individual authors—can transform the industry standard through action and create new norms. Small steps go a long way (but what these steps are and how they can be implemented are beyond our place).

Death and Community

As shocking as Matt Hughes’s death was, the outpouring of support from the writing community re-affirmed many of our core beliefs. We’re here for one another, through thick or thin. It’s weird, in a way, as freelancers vie for work against one another. If a group of individuals should loathe one another, we’d expect freelancers to be it. But no, we’re above that. And that’s a good thing.

For those reading that aspire to freelance for the major publications (or, y’know, make a career out of this), we welcome you to the fray. This is a brilliant industry with brilliant people. But make a friend. Maybe two. And never, never, never, be afraid to ask for help. Whether that’s on writing that hook you’ve been struggling with for a week or those demons you’ve been struggling with for years, ask for help. Please.

Good Games Writing

Our place, then.

Our place is to make these things happen. We strive to change the discourse. The debates about games writing aren’t going away, but there’s a surefire way to make them have meaning: accentuate the positive, learn from the negative. We can promote the best work we find from those that practice this ethos. We must determine our role in the gaming ecosystem, both as a part of Good Games Writing and as individuals at the helm of this site. Are we critics? Pundits? Bloggers? Journalists? Whatever our role, we must be diligent in maintaining our integrity.


GGW is a platform for change, for understanding, for appreciation. We can appreciate games, publications, people, etc. without losing our integrity. We can promote great works. And we can be individuals. But we must be cautious in blurring the lines, of wearing hats for roles we do not occupy. Good Games Writing is a beautiful thing. Our stakeholders are talented writers, some “professional” and some aspiring. We have promised to deliver you the best. But trust is essential: How do you know to trust what we say is good? Do you know we are the platform for change?
These are some of the difficult questions we are dealing with. We don’t claim to have the answers, but admitting what we don’t know is the first step to building rapport with you, the readers. We will strive to raise decorum in all we do, to open ourselves up to scrutiny, and to continue the conversation wherever possible. But we will make mistakes. Our promise to you is that we will own up when we do and strive to do better.
One final note: We want to hear from you. If you have comments about what we do, have a piece of writing you think is rad, have a problem with whatever, or just want to chat, we’re open to talk. You can ping us on Tumblr or Twitter and, if necessary, we’ll gladly continue the conversation through other means. Our goal is to be a part of the community.
What’s Left To Say?
Thanks. Thank you all for your continued support, for putting up with our silence through difficult times, and for being part of the conversation. In the coming days, weeks, months, and years, Good Games Writing will grapple with these issues (and assuredly others). You’re why we do it.
Thank you for changing the discourse.
Kyle McIntosh, founder
on behalf of Team GGW

nedroidcomics:

Years and years ago, I wrote out some opening lines for other people to use to get them started on their novels. Here they are again. Feel free to use them.

*********

As I would later learn, the old man at the bus stop was not communicating through American Sign Language, but rather was placing…

688,899 plays

benpaddon:

jaygirl:

yesididbringmydog:

iamthestrangeandunusual:

booptch:

whoopsie doo someone wanted an audio post

I LOVE YOU.

SCREAMING.

THIS JUST GETS BETTER AND BETTER

Someone made this, and I am grateful.

itswalky:

Trigger Warning: Weather
eoporto:

Lincoln CANNOT catch a break.

eoporto:

Lincoln CANNOT catch a break.

drvideogamez:

Dr Videogamez - The Death of Sega